Monthly Archives: March 2017

So You Think It Doesn’t Matter if Your Browser History is Made Readily Available? Better Seriously Think Again.

computermonitoring

By now the word is getting around how House and Senate Republicans voted and approved the removal of privacy regulations regarding consumer / citizen browsing history. Now that your privacy has been removed, folks are asking ‘what does this mean?’ or simply remixing indifferent, saying ‘so what?’ while others say; ‘they already can get this information.’

No, they couldn’t.

Prior to this regulation being removed you possessed a far greater degree of privacy. Police could, by way of a court order or proper legal process, access your browser history but now that private corporations can access your history directly without your approval, its open season (and btw: police likely will no longer need to have a court order to access your private browsing history now that regulations have been removed – just saying).

Here are just SOME of the likely immediate impacts:

  • Accessing your history means for better marketing and targeting on the part of private companies. Folks seeing that you’re researching for specific items or services will create targeted online ads far better (Facebook, or social media sites aside) then before. Think it’s unsettling now that those Facebook ads keep popping up regarding those websites you’ve just visited? You ain’t seen nothing yet!
  • Insurance companies and your employers can view your history without your knowledge, seeing how you’re looking at sites regarding certain diseases and act on the assumption that you have such a disease – and either deny you insurance courage or simply fire you from your job without telling you why.
  • Looking for a new job? Your employer can now access your browsing history and likewise fire you from your job – and again, without really telling you why you were fired.
  • Looking at ‘naughty’ sites? If you’re closeted sexually, this could be the ‘kiss of death’ for your career.
  • Doing some reading or study about banned countries? Government officials could place you on a watch list, monitoring your movements without your realization, perhaps even denying you your passport application if you wished to travel abroad.
  • Involved in a court / legal action? Better watch where you go and what your browser has: it could come up against you in your court action, with opposing counsel using this information against you in your legal action.
  • Are you an attorney? There’s nothing preventing your opponents from seeking what kind defense or offense you’re formulating in the course of trying a case.
  • It wouldn’t be too much of a reach to state that with growing governmental sentiment, folks involved with certain public groups, reading publications and websites deemed as anti-governmental could also be targeted. Think this is paranoid thinking? Know your history; this wouldn’t be the first time this kind of thing happened – and now with the removal of your browser search privacy, it’s made all the more easier.
  • And if this isn’t bad enough, this also includes where you are. Geocoding – mapping the location of where you post / conduct your Internet accessing – is also a growing issue as pricing for items and/or services can vary based upon where you are accessing the Internet. Some folks in certain zip codes pay more for products and services then others; now that your privacy protections have been removed, some can expect to pay more depending on where they are.

In the long run, privacy within an open society is not a contradiction: it is a necessity. Without certain safeguards and practices, we won’t have the confidence we feel to express our opinions without having to be defensive and fearful. The removal of privacy only encourages fear and intimidation within a Democracy, while enabling private entities to pocket ever more profit at your cost.

And by the way: this includes your iPhones / Androids / Tablets as well.

It’s now all totally open.

You are now naked on the Internet.

There are, however, viable cost-effective steps you can take to better protect yourself while continuing to live your life and remain confident in being who you are without having some nosy nitwit looking over your shoulder; we’ll discuss those shortly in the next round here at Shockwaverider.

 

How An AI Defines Customers

mccannjapan

Recently, in the Business Insider, a story spoke about how a Japanese Advertising agency hired an AI (see above picture) to do an ad campaign (http://www.businessinsider.com/mccann-japans-ai-creative-director-creates-better-ads-than-a-human-2017-3).

Surprising, it was rather successful.

The inventor, Shun Matsuzaka, “wanted to create the world’s first AI creative director, capable of directing a TV commercial”.

He did it. But before you can say “holy crap!” consider that the AI, like any electronically developed and programmed instrument, must be designed and have focus in order to do its job. You gotta tell it what to do and how to do it. So Matsuzaka’s team, “McCann Millennials” outlined two basic approaches necessary to capture an effective ad campaign:

The creative brief: The type of brand, the campaign goal, the target audience, and the claim the ad should make.

The elements of the TV ad: Including things such as tone, manner, celebrity, music, context, and the key takeout.

Confectionary corporation Mondelez took on the contract and hired the team’s AI, and so the contest was on. Selecting an industry expert to take on the challenge of creating a wining ad campaign against that of the McCann machine, the application approach was that the client was asked to fill out a form with all the elements they wanted to appear in the ad. The AI robot then scrambled the database for ideas (humans were required to actually produce the final creative).

The two spots would then be thrown to a nationwide poll, where consumers could vote for which ad they preferred.

The key phrase in which the ad was to revolve around was the following:

“Instant-effect fresh breath that lasts for 10 minutes.”

The winner?

Depends; 54% of the public participating in the vote voted for the human.

But for the ad executives, the AI won hands down. As the article stated: “when the 200-or-so advertising executives at the ISBA Conference were asked which they preferred, they voted for the crazy dog spot, directed by the robot. Clearly those advertising executives were not the target market for this particular campaign, but the experiment appeared to demonstrate just how creative — and funny — AI can be.”

Humor in AI?  Viewers familiar with science fiction will hear the common refrain that ‘robots can’t make people laugh.’ Guess that’s not the case anymore. Meantime, the McCann Millennials are at it again – this time, working on a “commercial database for the music industry to see if it can create the next pop smash hit.”

Somehow, I think  this latest project will be proved to be far easily for them to achieve.

(To see the ads, go to the link above and judge for yourself).